MAGNETICS IN-MATERIAL

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MAGNETICS IN-MATERIAL Objective

Magnetics In-Material weaves aesthetic movements from earth’s history. Magnetic emanations from the earth are woven to form visual representations. The textiles create an earth-based narrative from a geological perspective of time. Demarcated by textures and colours woven based on the recordings from the earth, the invisible forces from within the earth become Visual, Sensual (tactile), and Actual (woven). The textiles reveal understandings in human relationships with nature and present iterative opportunities to make textile(s) of the magnetic records at a variety of sites. Potential themes could be, but not limited to, locations of cultural and historical significance such as shrines, pilgrimage routes, or political and humanitarian organisations such as NATO and UNESCO. 

 

Field of Artistic Research  

Magnetics In-Material is a cross disciplinary artistic research project encompassing embodied cognition, imaging structures, textile, geologic sciences for epistemic investigations. The artistic research aims to look at the way images are both felt and understood, from a bottom-up approach. 

 

Research Question(s) 

How do places make people? Further questions here and expanded later on in Project Summary Goals: 

  • Can creating a sense of place be a viable concept for geographic empathy?
  • Ways touch and subjective experience contribute to quests for objectivity.
  • Creating sites for understanding, intuition, and subjectivity in technocratic culture and climate changes. 
  • Usefulness of statistical data models in evaluating Intelligence.
  • Responsibilities of data science and influences images have on social policy.
  • Art as supporting diversity in cultural rituals and identities. 
  • To what extent can culture support the disintegration of identity politics in favour of earth-based perspectives in the history of human behaviour, environmental fluctuations, social formations.
  • Can materials and production afford reliable alternatives to present-day socio-economic models.

 

Background, Research Context, Goals, Methods

Magnetics In-Material (Mi-M) developed from 6-years Pattern Recognition project. The project looks at the idea of A.I., landscape photography, and 1970’s American Land Art movement. With the orientation of working-with and not over emerges a biologically, ontological question: what creates a body? and the Mi-M question: how do places make people? The project and process looks at ways of working in relationship with nature, instead of using, or looking at, nature as pure resource. 

Gathered rocks from meditative hikes were numbered, archived, and drawn. Rock faces were made into drawings, drawings into choreography, and the feeling of the movements into the template for the visual textile project, Magnetics In-Material. By connecting my background with photography, image making and installation, dance and performance with my interests in geology and dating, the project realises several goals:

  • Giving people a sense of understanding through experience
  • Reprieve from alienation through creating belonging by connecting with nature
  • Temporal and sensorial reminders of wholeness and warmth in relations with nature
  • Realise the impossible act of hugging the visual field 
  • The body becoming in relationship with a place
  • Sharp textures into soft experiences
  • Absolute and brutal beauty of weather patterns into physically engaging comfort materials.

Magnetics In-Material weaves sensorial experience, repairing alienation by making the imaginary tactile. Woven fibres serve as temporal warmth. In creating a cultural way to connect with movements deep within the earth through touch, Magnetics In-Material weaves together traditions in art, technology, and social psychology.

 

Process & Reflexive Documentation

Utilise remnant magnetic data from organisations such as Norge’s Geologiske Undersøkelse and International Geoscience Organsiations, sourcing data to create dimensional textiles, such as jacquards with TC2 Loom technology, to show the top and inside, as interrelated surfaces. 

The process of the artistic research project based on the theory of how places making people, and study of pre-existing natural, magnetic phenomena. Magnetics are related to knowledge production in physics, the ontological question of existence whether or not humans observe the phenomenon. The process therefore involves ideas on documentation to bring human understanding with greater sensitivity with the nature. The fields have become politicised, and so the process and documentation will remain diligent to cite and source facts from peer-reviewed organisations. By exposing observations and facts alongside the project, the research already being done can come into public awareness alongside the textiles, creating site specific visual reference via Magnetics In-Material textiles.

Photographs/images, videos, writing as documentation of the process, as well as the formation of a visual database. The project can serve as a grounds for establishing a company that can bridge science and art. Organisation and design of the textiles, production, quality control and compiling the artworks to an exhibition. The goal is to eventually one day have designs created by hand at Gobelin.

   

Project Outline

Organisation and design of the textiles, production, quality control and compiling the artworks to an exhibition. The goal is to eventually one day have one of the designs created by hand at Gobelin.

    • Gather and Organise Geographic Data
    • Establish Structure for Project Elements and Publishing
    • Generate a Database of Texts, Sounds, and Visual Translations
    • Converting Geologic Frequencies into Sounds and Colour Spectrums in a Unique Aesthetic Database
    • Experimentation with Textiles for Conductivity, Sound, and Luminance Materials
    • Programming for Machine Output and Materialisation
    • Finalised Textile Production Through Machine Weaving (future goal production at Gobelin, FR)
    • Publishing of Project Elements and Results
    • Public Exhibition and Performance

 

Provisional Time Table and Work Plan

Year One 

    • Gather and Organise Geographic Data 
    • Establish Structure for reflexive project archive in an archive, web and print 
    • Converting Geologic Frequencies into Sounds and Colour
      Spectrums creating a Unique Database 
    • Weave Textile Designs from this Database 
    • Experiment with Materials for Conductivity, Sound,
      Luminance 
    • Produce Digitally Woven Samples 

Year Two 

    • Finalised Textile Production via Digital/Hand Machine
      Weaving 
    • Publishing of Project Elements, Reflexive Documentation
      (including video) and Results 
    • Choreography for the final exhibition 
    • Public Exhibition and Performance 
    • Finalisation & Publishing 
    • Process for therapeutic or social integration

Year Three And Beyond

    • Finalised Textile Production Through Machine Weaving
    • Publishing of Project Elements and Results 
    • Public Exhibition and Performance 
    • Finalisation & Publishing of Pedagogical Methodology (Possible Therapeutic or Social Integration Uses)

Year Four +Beyond

    • After first publication of dissertation and exhibition, repeat the process and production for more sites for exhibition and performance.

 

Budget

Potential Project Related Expenses

    • Workspace for production, shipping, or textile storage
    • Labor (personal or assistants), use of weaving machine: https://www.digitalweaving.no/product/ 
    • Sourcing yarns, fibres, and experimental materials (ex. copper or fibre optics)
    • Scholarships, Embassy Support, private donors, teaching fellowship, public workshops
    • Norge’s Geologiske Undersøkelse data is openly available for use
    • Travel for conferences, exhibitions, professional presentations, necessary networking 

 

Texts, Books, Journals, Research

Remnant Magnetism, https://www.britannica.com/science/remanent-magnetism
Norske Geologiske Undersøkelse, https://www.ngu.no 

Remanent magnetism (Paleomagnetism) or the permanent magnetism in rocks, resulting from the orientation of the Earth’s magnetic field at the time of rock formation in a past geological age is the source of information for the paleomagnetic studies of polar wandering and continental drift. Remanent magnetism can derive from several natural processes. This arises when magnetic minerals forming in igneous rocks cool through the Curie point and when the magnetic domains within the individual minerals align themselves with the Earth’s magnetic field, thus making a permanent record of its orientation. 

A second mechanism operates when small grains of magnetic minerals settle into a sedimentary matrix, producing detrital remanent magnetism. It is hypothesised that the tiny grains orient themselves in the direction of the Earth’s magnetic field during deposition and before the final consolidation of the rock. The magnetism thus introduced appears to persist through later alteration and compaction of the rock. 

Rocks may acquire remanent magnetism in at least two other ways: (1) rocks made up of nonmagnetic minerals chemically altered to yield magnetic minerals, and these newly formed minerals acquire remanent magnetism in the presence of the Earth’s magnetic field; and (2) igneous rocks already cooled may acquire remanent magnetism by a process called viscous magnetization. The difference between these types of remanent magnetism can be determined; magnetic history of a particular rock can therefore be interpreted via 6 basic types of magnetisation: (1) diamagnetism, (2) paramagnetism, (3) ferromagnetism, (4) antiferromagnetism, (5) ferrimagnetism, (6) superparamagnetism. 

 

Bibliography

Batchelor, David, Chromophobia, Reaktion Press, 2000.

Batchelor, David, The Luminous and the Gray, Reaktion Press, 2014.

Dragesund, Tove, and Alice Kvåle. “Study protocol for Norwegian Psychomotor Physiotherapy versus Cognitive Patient Education in combination with active individualized physiotherapy in patients with long-lasting musculoskeletal pain – a randomized controlled trial.” BMC musculoskeletal disorders vol. 17 325. 5 Aug. 2016, doi:10.1186/s12891-016-1159-8, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4974790/

Eco, Umberto, The Open Work, Harvard Univerity Press, 1989.

Eco, Umberto, Travels in Hyper Reality, Gruppo Editoriale, 1983

Eco, Umberto, Chronicles of a Liquid Society, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2016.

Ghezzo, Marta Arkossy, Solfege, Ear Training, Rhythm, Dictation, and Music Theory: A Comprehensive Course 3rd Edition, University Alabama Press, June 2005.

Haugeland, John, Artificial Intelligence: The Very Idea, A Bradford Book, 1985.

Johnson, Don, The Protean Body, Harpercollins, 1977.

Klempe, Sven Hroar, Cultural Psychology of Musical Experience, Information Age Publishing, 2016.

Mansoor, Asma, De-Anthropologising the Human and its Impact on Racism: A Third World Perspective Proceedings of A Body of Knowledge, Embodied Cognition and the Arts Conference CTSA UCI, 8-10 Dec 2016, https://escholarship.org/uc/item/1ds0r585

Mate, Gabor, When the Body Says No: Understanding the Stress-Disease Connection. Wiley, January 2011.

Mate, Gabor, In the Realm of Hungry Ghosts, Close Encounters with Addiction, North Atlantic Books, 2008.

Noë, Alva, Strange Tools: Art and Human Nature, Hill and Wang, September 2015. Noë, Alva, Varieties of Presence, Harvard University Press, 2009.

Noë, Alva, Why You Are Not Your Brain, and Other Lessons from the Biology of Consciousness, Hill and Wang, February 2009.

Sapowlsky, Robert, (neuroendocrinologist, author, professor of biology, neurology and neurological sciences) Stanford Lectures, published by Stanford University on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NNnIGh9g6fA

Scarry, Elaine, The Body in Pain, Oxford University Press, 1984.

Scarry, Elaine, On Beauty and Being Just, Princeton University Press, 1999.

Scarry, Elaine, Thinking In An Emergency, W.W. Norton & Company, March 2014.

Scarry, Elaine, Resisting Representation, Oxford University Press, 1994.

Scwhenk, Theodore, Sensitive Chaos, Rudolf Steiner Press, 1965.

Van Der Kolk, Bessel A. M.D., The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma, Penguin Random House, September 2014.

 

Artists

Ingrid Aarset’s work with textiles and technology.

Lygia Pape and Lygia Clarke, for their contributions to performances using textiles and groups of human bodies.

Pedro Gomez-Egaña for the spiritual in the technological age.

Amanda Steggel’s, Mind the Gap, work with synthesia and for mapping the way sounds relate to colors and energy centres of the body.

Dorothea Tanning’s surrealism to make the invisible but felt senses of lived experience tactile, formal, pictorial and spacial. 

Live Bugge’s, The Other Wild, for investigations on the boundaries on behavior and transgressions. 

Katrine Koster Holst’s work on the landscape changing over time.

Geir Harald Semuelsen’s work with light. 

Francesca Capone’s direct, literal, blocks discerning patterns.

 

Ethical Considerations

Privacy, GDPR, internet laws and regulations to access and storage of data, legal consent, public information, and privacy of individual contributions will be considered.

Translating data must be understood from the perspective of artistic choices, underlined by the effort to maintain elemental integrity. Considering subjectivity in processes borrowed from scientific methodology, actual realised results cannot be considered wholly objective. This shall be acknowledged, questioned, written, and shared in presentations, publications, and future developments from the Magnetics In-Material project.

The research methodologies to be considered as critical or negotiable features for future research methodologies and with the possibility for other institutional use, pedagogical developments in the realm of private or government institutions, or public domain.

The research and pedagogical approach developed during the project are free to be used for running workshops and courses alongside the project. These courses can be used for enriching local cultural exchange, as an educational resource and site for additional funding of the project.

Resourcing local production to minimise international shipping or travel expenses.

Insurance for the artwork, machines, materials, and data, to be purchased and maintained throughout the duration of the research and productions thereafter.

Language, writing and documentation will be reviewed for facts and technical accuracy. The number of unforeseeable ethical considerations will be consulted through the advisory team, faculty, and staff, considering international copyright and intellectual property laws.

 


 

TEXTILE DESIGN

ATELIER WOLFE SHOP WITH VIDA

 


 


 

PRODUCT SAMPLES

 

  • Photography: Bjørnar Brende Smestad/@bjornarsmestad Model: Ida T/@idambt Artist: Rachel Wolfe/@atelierwolfe Top: #ArtIt/@art_it.no AD: Rudy Wolff/@rudy_wolff

 

 


FIBERS

Ongoing fiber art projects and commissions. The fibers are sourced from shops in Norway. A wool/acrylic blend is often knitted with Alpaca and/or silk/mohair threads. The fibers used are naturally anti-microbial and can be aired-out, spot or dry-cleaned. 

For commissions contact Rachel at: rachel@rachelwolfe.com

 

 

Kjerringøy Scarves, 2020, single colour wool with mohair/alpaca/acrylic accent. Sold.

      [INSER SLIDER]

 


 

Out of the Blue, 2020, single colour wool/acrylic blend with silk mohair accent, Sold.

 

 


 

Sedona Woolie, 2020, single colour wool/acrylic blend with silk mohair accent, Sold.

My super duper cosy and SOFT woolie made by @rachelwolfeartist makes me feel luxurious.

-Tonya Hansen, Colorado, USA

 

 

 


 

Mustard Woolie, 2020, single colour wool/acrylic blend with silk mohair accent, Sold.

 

 


 

Butterscotch Scarf, 2020, single colour wool/acrylic blend with silk mohair accent, commissioned.

 

 


 

Neapolitan Woolie, 2020, single colour wool/acrylic blend with silk mohair accent, commissioned.

If you’re looking for a gift @rachelwolfeartist is amazing to work with. We designed this to match my winter coat. Absolutely adore her and her work.

-Tracy Goodheart, Evanston, Illinois, USA

 

 

 


 

Nordic Lys Scarf, 2020, single colour wool/acrylic blend with silk mohair accent, commissioned.

 

 


 

Desert Sands Woolie, 2020, single colour wool/acrylic blend with silk mohair accent, commissioned.

My WOOLIE is soft and cozy; the perfect thing to keep my neck warm on cold days and nights. Rachel took the time to choose colors that fit my taste and personality. Thank you!

-Jonathan Skurnik, California, USA

 

 

 


 

Nordic Sol Wrap, 2020, single colour cotton with two-wool, collected by an artist in Italy.

 

 

 


 

Denison Borealis Blanket, 2018, dip-dye alpaca, wool bland.

Delicious and soft wool plaid, which can warm even on the coldest days and it does not scratch.

I use it both as a blanket, bedspread and plaid and since wool is unique in being able to insulate against both heat and cold, it is in use all year round. Wool is nature’s own choice of clothes, and therefore also my choice. -John Wagner, Denmark

The knitted scarf we received was crafted of fibers balanced just right together.  Not just the colors but the combinations of material working in harmony and creating a piece that is timeless!

Glad to know you have been working more with the knitted pieces.  It seems to me different types of materials will have a different energy to them even and I don’t think many people get that like you do. I like to think about how the very small things in life such as a wool thread or microbes inside and outside us all are such valuable neighbours. It seems many times we think that only certain aspects of our mind or statuses are what matters to one another, but there is so much that makes us each up and weaves together. In fact so much more than we likely know about our own being let alone each other. Life is a precious and good thing and what an opportunity we have each day we wake up.

 -Kurt, Michigan, USA

 

 

 


 

Cake Comfort Pillow, 2019, multi-coloured wool, pillow, sold to collector in Los Angeles.

 

 

 


 

Ovalo Woolie, 2019,  single colour wool/acrylic blend, commissioned by an artist for a family gift.

 

 

 


 

Bellarus Woolie, 2019, single colour wool/acrylic blend, single colour alpaca. Commissioned by a client as a gift for a family member abroad in Bellarus.

 

 

 


 

Stein Scarf, 2019,  single colour wool/acrylic blend, single colour alpaca. Commissioned by a muscian, educator, and public service professional in Los Angeles, California.

 

 

 


 

Rock ‘n Roll Woolie, 2019, single colour wool/acrylic blend, multi-colour alpaca, commissioned by a designer and business owner in Oslo, for his daughter.

 

 

 


 

Hauge Bliss Wrap, 2019,  single colour wool/acrylic blend, single colour alpaca. Commissioned by an Osteopath in Oslo, Norway.

 

 

 


 

Silverberg Tree Scarf, 2016-2017, dip-dye brown wool, white and maroon alpaca.

Scarf with poem purchased by nature scientist and geographer. “As rings on a tree, this soft wrap grew, knitted, unearthing, mighty threads of soft white into rounds, encircling, a body warm.”

 

 

 


 

Wagner Vein Blanket, 2017,  two-colour wool. Purchased by an artist & collector.

 

 

Keeping warm. The relationship between the mind and the body can be most directly understood by experience. As feeling and sensation are subjective, individual territory, the Vein Blanket uses colours to visualise pathways in which circulation travels around the body. The weight of this blanket makes carrying and transport something considered, to not take lightly. As the body and its contents and discontents worth weighing. The warmth of this blanket, producing a by-the-fire experience in the frigid Norwegian winters.

 

 


 

Yun Bundle, 2016, dip-dyed acrylic, cotton blend baby blanket. Gifted.

 

 

Keeping cool. Transitioning from the body into the world marks quite often a change in temperature and a temporary change in temperament. The dyed yarn symbolises the transitioning from one space to another, and is knit in a loose manner to allow air to circulate freely when wrapped around the body. The blanket was made for a friend in the early stages of second gestation. The blanket was made to be a shared item between the siblings, to keep cool and also protected in the humid Korean summers.

 

 


 

Gottardo Florence Mohair, 2016, single coloured mohair. Gifted.

 

 

A mother and her daughter will share so much. This wrap was made to function both as blanket, as scarf, shawl, and represent the bond between a mother and daughter.

 

 


 

First fibers materialise dreams and psyche-textures.

 

  • First project in high school art course.

 

Waterfall Tapestry.  A failed art class assignment from a dream: A waterfall flowing from a forest, stones at the bottom.

Stop Smoking Swath. Early days, learning the basics as a means to stop smoking. Seems obvious in the result.

Handmade Pillows. Working with found materials from Oma. Fabrics and buttons from another time.

Red Scarf in the Sun.  A scarf thick enough to protect the neck and hold up the head.

Fog Blanket. Working with wool from Ukrainian sheep, dyed in the color of the foggy nordic sky.

Various Scarves. Two material and single material scarves.

 


 

PATTERN RECOGNITION

 

PATTERN RECOGNITION, (teaching and artistic process), meditation, drawing, movement, writing, video.

A process for multiple applications such as art making, teaching and workshops, psychology and counsel. Pattern Recognition was built alongside the Afjordance artistic research project. Pattern Recognition Projects apply principles and ideas in John Haugeland’s book on Artificial Intelligence to develop a method of learning through doing. These methods of learning are designed to develop critical thinking skills, while forming healthy relationships and understandings with terrains and temporality. Pattern Recognition involves understandings and practices in the field of Embodied Cognition. The Pattern Recognition projects work dynamically with individuals in the Vision and Body Relationship, coordination and motor skill development. The Pattern Recognition projects work together and with memory, behavior, lineage, choices, and agency. There are presently 5 Segments in this ongoing process development.

 

 

 

SEGMENT ONE

The first step is to experience a sensitised exploration of the environment. Through meditation and movement to go into contact with intuition. The intuition guides the gathering of materials from the environment.

 

SEGMENT TWO

The second step is to draw materials from the environment. Following an axial rotation similar to the scientifically reported rotation of the earth, the faces (planes) of the dimensional materials are drawn. In this example, drawings were made, the tracings make the under-layers visible on the new top layers of tracings. The concept is to make the impressions of the dynamic modes of axial rotation visible. The practice brings awareness to the memory and sensory ways a visible detail can fade in visibility but remain within the under-layers.

 

 

SEGMENT THREE

The third step is involves Visual and Somatic Memory. The lines drawn in the previous exercise are performed as body movements. Exercises are practiced independently, leaving room for personal interpretation. A group environment affords the opportunity to coordinate independent movements into a group arrangement of movements. Records of these practices are used for reflection and to witness development of reflexive awareness over time.

 

SEGMENT FOUR

To experience nature and nurture concept of impression and transference, two transferrable materials are used with water and pigment. Other materials can be useful. For the sake of providing an example, gouache paintings with two pieces of paper follow 2 different impulse. 1 impulse to paint from memory. The 2nd impulse to paint from a photo.

To look at the difference between making something look like something else or using memory (embodied sense of experience) – the gouache painting exercise was carried out by making compositions based on memories of witnessing detailed areas of water flow, and composing paintings based on looking at a photograph. Viewers could immediately see the difference.

The gouache paintings were done on the “wrong side” of Japanese Washi paper, to transfer the pigments onto acid-free, black papers. The pigments left traces similar to the way a memory becomes a trace of lived experience or ways communication of forms become transferred onto what is underneath or nearby.

In addition to discerning difference in how forms are made by hand from referencing external or internal referents, is also considering the process of transfer. As the original can become a symbol for reading-as reading a book or remembering a book, the paint transferred to the surface under becomes the information absorbed.

 

 

SEGMENT FIVE

A mirroring exercise, completed with language and/or illustration. By writing a letter in reverse, to see how it appears through a material and in a mirror. The practice is based on the mechanics of a single-reflex camera and the way the eye perceives reality directly which is then flipped in the brain. This practice develops understanding of communication and the two-way nature of the way read symbols are transmitted and interpreted.