RELATIVELY DIMENSIONAL STILL-LIFE, 1919 IN 2017

RELATIVELY DIMENSIONAL STILL-LIFE, 1919 IN 2017, 5 images as a set, archive ink on (13 x 19 inch) digital negative film. Ltd. edition of 3. The candle, a tradition in Dutch still-life painting is realised in CMYK representation of IKEA Interior Objects, as a representation of the way images layer and flow before our eyes on digital screens.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

TEKNOVISUELL EXPERIENCE

Teknovisuell Experience involves several layers in the materiality of the image, systems and processes in imaging, the vision-body relationship, and ways civilisations form understandings of nature. From an empirical, materialist philosophical standpoint, the works reflect on age-old discussions between Platonic and Sophist ideas, and the places spiritual and scientific ideas are permitted. Through the emphasis on the ethereal nature of screen-based technologies, the Teknovisuell Experience Details take-up these conversations both through the processes in which they were created and in the results of the viewers interactions and memories with images. By engaging the physical body with the vision, the distance in viewing engages viewers’ bodies in the opportunity to look at processes otherwise invisible to users of screen-based technology, but evident to builders of technology such as R&D, the coder, manufacturer and marketer. The details in Teknovisuell Experience were composed of the decomposition of images up and downloaded through social media channels; 7 times for each image. The final images reconstitute a representation, highlighting the way images become a form of cultural ritualisation. By further manipulating the image to highlight degraded visual qualities, and print at large scale or clip sections out as fragments, the various installation formats available engage viewers in contemplation of the areas in an increasingly liquid society. The scale and application of the image evokes motifs and patterns found in traditions of totems and textiles. Still images applied as wall coverings, pillars, scrolls or flags. Digital gifs of the images afford exhibition on screens and move static light reflections, creating visually ghostly movements.

 

 

Teknovisuell Experience, Public Installation of Detail #5, Otis College of Art and Design Admissions Office, Los Angeles, California, 2017. The artwork engages the relationships of body & space to image technology through the clarity of perceived images. The imaging processes displace and reform pigments and images, creating fuzzy borders. The Teknovisuell Experience series represents images of water as aesthetic and ethical qualities technology raises in our societies and is part of Virtual Material conversation,

Digital Image, 2015/6, sizes start at 61,04 x 76,2 cm (24 x 30in)

Digital Image, 2015/6, sizes start at 61,04 x 76,2 cm (24 x 30in)

Digital Image, 2015/6, sizes start at 61,04 x 76,2 cm (24 x 30in)

Digital Image, 2015/6, sizes start at 61,04 x 76,2 cm (24 x 30in)

Digital Image, 2015/6, sizes start at 61,04 x 76,2 cm (24 x 30in)

Digital Image, 2015/6, sizes start at 61,04 x 76,2 cm (24 x 30in)

 


 

ULTRAVIOLET FOREST 2016

ULTRAVIOLET FOREST, 2015-2016, digitally manipulated photography, limited edition of 8, sizes variable; GIF Transition made for NFT follow still images. Images cast in the UV spectrum often used for forensics and medical imaging. The phenomena of phosphoresce realise a surreal spectacle as a sublime visual memory. The images were originally made at Starved Rock State Park in Illinois, a historical battle site between settlers and natives. Present-day landscapes often gaze into are through screens. The Ultraviolet Forest series provides viewers as a witness to their bodied experience of landscape in the technocratic age. These landscapes were informed by Nancy Holt and Richard Serra’s Boomerang video, posted after the images. 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

ISEN 2015

Isen, film photography to digitised and looped gif, 2015. Isen, from old languages meaning vigorous, strong instrument, or holy metal. The direct positive film exposure of coastal waters rising and repeating appear as ice on screen, looping. The GIF is a Daoist understanding of the way power dynamics playout on illuminated screens. Climate change has been in the news since before I was born including forecasts for ice ages and cataclysmic end of the world stories. During my lifetime the story has been focused on icemelt, heating, and intensified weather patterns. In my interest in finding errors in human perception, logic, and studying nature for its cues about reality, I wondered if I could use visible material today to understand the natural forces that exist. I used medium format film, scanned it, and used the negative impression of the scan to depict forms visible at a beach. The forms presented could really be any beach, and in the inverted negative visual appearance, a scene in the arctic. Though the photographs were made in Half Moon Bay, California, inverting the values of the waves flowing in and out, show the tidal ebbs and flows of water along the cost. The artwork is part of a larger body of worked titled Virtual Material which includes, images, gifs, and videos.

 

 



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Real Self Image

Real Self Image, 2015, iPhone and Instagram Filters. The images were made to be scrolled through on a larger television screen in an exhibition to draw critical attention to the cultural fixation on identity and image.

 

The word real is supposed to establish something existing in the world. We can posit knowing an image is not real but is contained within a framework reconstituting an impression of an actuality. The photographic’s relationship to the referent changed drastically with the advent of digital imaging technology. Manipulation became increasingly prevalent and image making became a form of painting. Image manipulation has been around long before photography, however, the apparatus of photography, facilitates a diving into structures of falseness and accuracy.

 

 The question is Real on what basis? From the 2000’s forward, unreal, would be almost impossible to pin down. Therefore Virtual, Tactile, Projected, and other words suggestive of qualities come to rescue conceptions of Real.

 

Real Self Image looks at looking, and points towards the logical errors and oversights possible in reading an image. As Cletus Dalglish-Schommer described art movements in his course of Conceptualism to Post-Modern Art at Otis Grad Fine Arts, “trust me art”, implies trust, not only in the visual creations themselves but in the words affixed to the creation’s history. For an artist say say: I am telling the truth, will most certainly be met with: “there is no truth,” “there are only many truths,” “art is a lie that tells the truth.” Real Self Image is an attempt to point toward simultaneously toward the image and the viewer and ask: who decides?

 

A hoodie with the word “REAL” is worn on the self-portrait of the artist wearing a sea-salt paste over the face. Both water and salt are repeated elements in the works of the artists, for their complex compositions and relationships to commerce and trade. Salt and water are among the most common, abundant resources on earth. Placing such commonplace materials onto a face with the “Passport Photo” expression points towards the globalist movements promising liberation at technocrat expenses.

 

The scrolling aspect of Real Self Image may not immediately conjure memories of reading writing on scroll format; but is contained in the presentation to point towards the certitude of death. For if Identity supersedes Real, and Image supersedes Actual, the terms of value in life invert the values understood to be generative of life. The way someone or something appears may change the way they are understood within the viewer, but does not necessarily change what was actually there.

 

The upside-down, single-reflex apparatus photography was built suggests turning things upside down to get a gain a thorough looking at, versus affixing materials or meaning to chromatic shades of spectral value. The tonal masks ascribed value or meaning, are a bit like grown-up colouring books and the self-portrait and viewer are the sites of value and meaning.

 


 

Real self image, 2015. Scrolling touch screen installation.

chrome image

fade image

green image

instant image

mono image

noir image

none image (original)

process image

real image

tonal image

transfer image

 

chrome_960 fade_960 green_960 instant_960 mono_960 noir_960 original_960 process_960 real_960 tonal_960 transfer_960

SUSPENDED PLANES 2015

 

 

SUSPENDED PLANES, 2015, Installation, Configurations 1.0-4.0, Culver City, CA

Two square planes, one clear and one glossy black paint, suspended by tension from which nails affix twine to the wall. Painted gold clamps grasp each corner, as twine slips through, a projection of hands touching themselves as light passes onto, through, and around the planes as a meditation on words written by Kafka, “We photograph things in order to drive them out of our minds.”  The work expands the nature of the photographic image into a physically experienced, dimensional space. Centralizing a corning with a double planes of plexi, emphasize the hovering and pointing qualities of image making, and sensual experiences of an image. In a single-reflex system, such a quote appears articulated from observable reality, as each configuration assigning a new variable, shows the limits of such a system. Viewers are able to physically navigate this single reflex system, with the aim to point to multiple systems of the their bodies to enable and dismantle a singular-reflex system. The final configuration 4,0 leading to a direct experience of the single-reflex planes obfuscation of bodily projection.

 

 

Materials 1.0 Twine, nail, clamp, gold and black gloss paint, two panels of acrylic 40.64 x 40.64cm 2.0 Same as above with projected light 3.0 Same as above with projected video 4.0 Same as above with projected video

 

 

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