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VIRTUAL MATERIAL

VIRTUAL MATERIAL, 2012 – 2022, images, videos, installations, projections, public art, textiles. In the realm of imaging, the bodied digestion of visual stimulus forms the bond the human being as to their environment. In the radical changes in digitisation the way human beings imagine has rapidly changed. As the ideas for individualism and a friendly nature press people into polarised bulges and distortions, questions about the human perception are posed in the series of works developed over the past 10 years. In looking at what this actually means for people and our relationships to notions of virtual and material, the imagination of what is or is not, the works in Virtual Material are composed with these questions in mind. Inspired by Kafka’s words; “We photograph things in order to drive them out of our minds”, Virtual Material seeks to transform the nature of the photographic image into a physical experienced, dimensional space, and as an overall installation, a coordination with photographs installed on the walls and in free-standing panels.  

 

VÆRE LIEF, 2020, 4:47 single channel video, on the nature of belief and the meaning of beloved.

 

AFJORDANCE, 2019, 13:47 single channel video, soundtrack composed by the digital armature joint movements referencing an open source audio library of wind. The video was developed through artistic research on the complexities emerging in Artificial Intelligence, the ways humans create mirrored structures, and affordances in the notions of Intelligence itself. The video was developed from Solfege Souche cultivated over research conducted 2015 – 2018. Exhibited in California, Norway, and Italy. 

 

SOLFEGE SOUCHE, 2018, single-channel video (3 formats), sound composition and arrangement. “Ut queant laxīs resonāre fībrīs; Mīra gestōrum famulī tuōrum; Solve pollūtī labiī reātum, Sancte Iōhannēs.”  A Solfège Souche is by definition the root of a forgotten connection with nature. In times of rapidly increased use of technology, humans face increased stimulation and variables on age old questions in ethics and morality. In an effort to portray a dynamic relationship with nature, instead of dominance over nature, the Butoh movements recreate ways lifeforms cut down in the forest continually find ways to reach towards light. This space framed in the video presents a body moving amongst an autumnal forest, merging and emerging from light and shadows. The body draws lines through movement; binaural beats compose the soundtrack. The pitches register at markers in time, reminiscent of ear trauma or tinnitus. The Solfège Souche video is situated at the intersection of dance, performance, video art, projection, embodied cognition research, and resonance study. The artistic research and pedagogical development around the project asks the questions: Are our cultural and bodily movements dangerous if we do not understand what we stand to lose? In what ways do sounds move and change forms from within the body and around? 

 

MOUVEMENTS, 2015-2018, photography, public artwork, textiles. The Mouvements series looks at the materiality of digital imaging technology. Informed by tensions in oil and water resources, the sublime iridescence in water forms are highlighted by minuscule film grains amplified after film scanning. The mutable quality of water and beauty is activated by the hypnotic colour palette used in screen technology. The epistemology of water, or ways we come to understand intelligences in water remains an ongoing endeavour. To see what humans are doing with technology, invites and requires extended looking and consideration. By engaging distances in viewing, the ways appearances can obfuscate and reveal, expand and contract, engage the senses of movement and stillness through looking. The images in the series take up elements of oil and water as allegory for technocratic times. Umberto Eco wrote in several books on late modernity including Chronicles of a Liquid Society in nuanced detail, poetically posited in the series: images are read, and embodied cognitive connections and relations are realised as a malleable surfaces.

 

BORA, 2018, 4:50 single channel video, looking at the ways landscapes become impressed through vision in different colour spectrums. The Nordic forest is transformed into a tropical affect with music evocative of shopping centers and marketing videos. Depth and flatness is presented for the viewer to imagine what it might be to see the mystic and elementals formations in their everyday encounters.

 

 

TEKNOVISUELL EXPERIENCE, 2015 – 2017, Teknovisuell Experience involves several layers in the materiality of the image, systems and processes in imaging, the vision-body relationship, and ways civilisations form understandings of nature. From an empirical, materialist philosophical standpoint, the works reflect on age-old discussions between Platonic and Sophist ideas, and the places spiritual and scientific ideas are permitted. Through the emphasis on the ethereal nature of screen-based technologies, the Teknovisuell Experience Details take-up these conversations both through the processes in which they were created and in the results of the viewers interactions and memories with images. By engaging the physical body with the vision, the distance in viewing engages viewers’ bodies in the opportunity to look at processes otherwise invisible to users of screen-based technology, but evident to builders of technology such as R&D, the coder, manufacturer and marketer. The details in Teknovisuell Experience were composed of the decomposition of images up and downloaded through social media channels; 7 times for each image. The final images reconstitute a representation, highlighting the way images become a form of cultural ritualisation. By further manipulating the image to highlight degraded visual qualities, and print at large scale or clip sections out as fragments, the various installation formats available engage viewers in contemplation of the areas in an increasingly liquid society. The scale and application of the image evokes motifs and patterns found in traditions of totems and textiles. Still images applied as wall coverings, pillars, scrolls or flags. Digital gifs of the images afford exhibition on screens and move static light reflections, creating visually ghostly movements.

Digital Image, 2015/6, sizes start at 61,04 x 76,2 cm (24 x 30in)

Digital Image, 2015/6, sizes start at 61,04 x 76,2 cm (24 x 30in)

Digital Image, 2015/6, sizes start at 61,04 x 76,2 cm (24 x 30in)

Digital Image, 2015/6, sizes start at 61,04 x 76,2 cm (24 x 30in)

Digital Image, 2015/6, sizes start at 61,04 x 76,2 cm (24 x 30in)

Digital Image, 2015/6, sizes start at 61,04 x 76,2 cm (24 x 30in)

 

STOP BATH, 2017, 30:45 single channel video, original soundtrack. The video looks at Lacan’s concepts of flickering and screen memories, and the structures of narrative through the elements of nature and a digitally cast coloured vision. 

 

 

ULTRAVIOLET FOREST,2015-2022, digitally manipulated photography and GIF, 50,8 x 76,19 cm, In Ultraviolet Forest, landscapes are cast in UV spectrum, often used for forensics and medical imaging. Phosphorescence in the terrain-scapes as a sensory perception open a sublime visual memory into our bodied relationship with nature. The original images were made at Starved Rock State Park in Illinois, a historical battle site between settlers and natives. While present-day landscapes often gazed at through illuminated screens, the Ultraviolet Forest series invites viewers into a physical witness of bodied experience in visual material. These terrain-scapes are intended to be exhibited with the Bora video were informed by Nancy Holt and Richard Serra’s Boomerang video, posted after the images.

     
   
   
   

 

 

MEMORIA TECHNICA, 2015 – 2017, a series of 5 monolithic images, sizes vary, recent exhibition of the monoliths measured 90,64 x 180 cm ( 35,68 x 70,87 in ), Film exposures realized as seasons, axiomatically marking the vertical landscape in relationship with the human body in magnetic resonance imaging. Reflected and refracted rays form a curvature filled and hollowed by literary translation of tactile qualities associated with the four seasons. The monolith as markers in chronoception – the sense and perception of passage through time.

 

RELATIVELY DIMENSIONAL STILL-LIFE, 1919 in 20175 images as a set, archive ink on (13 x 19 inch) digital negative film. Limited edition of 3. The candle, a tradition in Dutch still-life painting, is realised in CMYK tones. The layers of images perform a representation of the way light and visual perception flow before our eyes on and through digital screens.

 

Prints separated and placed on acid-free paper to block transparency.

 

REAL SELF IMAGE, 2015, iPhone and Instagram Filters. The images were made to be scrolled through on a larger television screen in an exhibition to draw critical attention to the cultural fixation on identity and image.

 

ISEN, film photography to digitised and looped gif, 2015. Isen, from old languages meaning vigorous, strong instrument, or holy metal. The direct positive film exposure of coastal waters rising and repeating appear as ice on screen, looping. The GIF is a Daoist understanding of the way power dynamics playout on illuminated screens. Climate change has been in the news since before I was born including forecasts for ice ages and cataclysmic end of the world stories. During my lifetime the story has been focused on icemelt, heating, and intensified weather patterns. In my interest in finding errors in human perception, logic, and studying nature for its cues about reality, I wondered if I could use visible material today to understand the natural forces that exist. I used medium format film, scanned it, and used the negative impression of the scan to depict forms visible at a beach. The forms presented could really be any beach, and in the inverted negative visual appearance, a scene in the arctic. Though the photographs were made in Half Moon Bay, California, inverting the values of the waves flowing in and out, show the tidal ebbs and flows of water along the cost. The artwork is part of a larger body of worked titled Virtual Material which includes, images, gifs, and videos.

 

 

Fleurresence, 2015, film photography layered and digitally manipulated, 2015, images, proposed as layers of woven images, connected by threads to each layer of imagery.

   

 

SUSPENDED PLANES, 2015, Installation, Configurations 1.0-4.0, Culver City, CA, Two square planes, one clear and one glossy black paint, suspended by tension from which nails affix twine to the wall. Painted gold clamps grasp each corner, as twine slips through, a projection of hands touching themselves as light passes onto, through, and around the planes as a meditation on words written by Kafka, “We photograph things in order to drive them out of our minds.”  The work expands the nature of the photographic image into a physically experienced, dimensional space. Centralizing an illuminated and flickering corner with double planes of plexi, emphasize the hovering and pointing qualities of image making, and sensual experiences of an image. In a single-reflex system, such a quote appears articulated from observable reality, as each configuration assigning a new variable, shows the limits of such a system. Viewers are able to physically navigate this single reflex system, with the aim to point to multiple systems of the their bodies to enable and dismantle a singular-reflex system. The final configuration 4,0 leading to a direct experience of the single-reflex planes obfuscation of bodily projection.

 

 

BLAST,2014, 3:16 stop-motion video, installation, Culver City, CA, USA. Materials: Ready-made glass bear coin bank, institutional pink antibacterial hand soap, and photographs. The artwork was made within the context of studying at an art school heavily influenced by a consortium of Frankfurt School ideologies. The stop-motion video loops in endless rotation, where the glossy edge of the bear form performs the barrier between the backdrop evocative of nuclear blasting test sites. The quirky and spooky movements of stop-motion, indicated the structures established during WWII are animated and reanimated in an endless loop by the imaginations of viewers today. The suggestion the sanitisation material (antibac soap) would leak out the top, if the bear bank was turned on end hovers as a possibility. 

 

 

SONIDOS, 2014, digital images and GIFS composed of analogue photography and visualisations of audio files. Sonidos is part of Virtual Material. Virtual Material exploits as many aspects of photography and engages in a multiplicity of subjects including water, stones, forests, technology, vision, body, perception, ethics, joy and care. Virtual Material works include: Mouvements, Teknovisuell Experience, Sonidos, Ultraviolet Forest, and a number of videos and installation artworks as prints, projections, wall coverings, acrylic prints, garments.

 

 

 

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